God upholds the cause of the fatherless and the widow, and befriends the stranger, providing him with food and clothing. You too must befriend the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt  -(Deuteronomy10:19)

                       

The  Ketubah

 

Jewish wedding contract

 

                           

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A ketubah (Hebrew: כתובה ), "document"; pl. ketubot) is a Jewish Pre-nuptial contract. It is considered an integral part of a traditional Jewish marriage. It states that the husband commits to provide food, clothing and marital relations to his wife, and that he will pay a specified sum of money in the event of a divorce.

 

Ketubah History

The rabbis in ancient times insisted on the marriage couple entering into the ketubah as a protection for the wife. It acted as a replacement of the biblical dower or bride price, which was payable at the time of the marriage by the groom to the bride or her parents.

The ketubah became a mechanism whereby the amount due to the wife (the dower) came to be paid in the event of the cessation of marriage, either by the death of the husband or divorce. It may be noted that the biblical bride price created a major social problem: many young prospective husbands could not raise the bride price at the time when they would normally be expected to marry.

So, to enable these young men to marry, the rabbis, in effect, delayed the time that the amount would be payable, when they would be more likely to have the sum. The mechanism adopted was to provide for the bride price to be a part of the ketubah. It may also be noted that both the dower and the ketubah amounts served the same purpose: the protection for the wife should her support (either by death or divorce) cease. The only difference between the two systems was the timing of the payment.

It is the predecessor to the wife's present-day entitlement to maintenance in the event of the breakup of marriage. Another function performed by the ketubah amount was to provide a disincentive for the husband contemplating divorcing his wife: he would need to have the amount to be able to pay to the wife.

 

Role in Wedding Ceremony

The ketubah is signed by two witnesses and traditionally read out under the huppa. It is then handed to the bride for safekeeping.

 

Design and Language

Contemporary ketubot have many different styles of language and designs, depending on the beliefs and traditions of the couple.

 

Rabbi Carter is pleased  to recommend Ketubah Studios of MP Artworks for your chuppah (click here) ketubah or interfaith marriage contract.

 

Receive a 10% discount.

download PDF Voucher for 10%  off

 

Copy Ketubah Discount Code:

 

            RRCH3E10SZ4D93 
 

Logon to: Micah Parker Ketubah Studio

 

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Micah Parker Ketubah Studios features an exclusive collection of ketubah designs, created by a select group of Judaic and fine artists who represent a more diverse range of artistic styles than you'll find anywhere else.

You can search through their ketubah designs by artist, color, style, theme, title or all. You may have them  include your own wedding vows for a completely personalized ketubah text.

 

All of their ketubah texts are available with any Jewish or secular designs.

 

    View more Micah Parker Ketubah designs.

 

Rabbi Carter recommends MP Artworks for your Ketubah needs, as their work is beautiful, personalized, reliable and affordable.

 

To receive your 10% discount when ordering, use this coupon code RRCH3E10SZ4D93 at check-out.

OR

download PDF Voucher for 10%  off

 

To view the MP Artworks site for a wide range of ketubot and chuppot  

 

LOGON to Mica Parker Ketubah Studio

 

 

 The Huppah

 

     To receive your $50.00 chuppa discount use this code:

        RRCH3E10SZ4D93-C

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Updated Tishrei 5770 Thank you for visiting.  

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